20150829

Astronomy current events question: star travel through Milky Way galaxy

Astronomy 210L, fall semester 2015
Cuesta College, San Luis Obispo, CA

Students are assigned to read online articles on current astronomy events, and take a short current events quiz during the first 10 minutes of lab. (This motivates students to show up promptly to lab, as the time cut-off for the quiz is strictly enforced!)
Minerva Baumann, "Stellar Discovery: NMSU Researchers Co-author Study Revealing Stars in Galaxy Have Moved" (July 30, 2015)
newscenter.nmsu.edu/Articles/view/11291/stellar-discovery-nmsu-researchers-co-author-study-revealing-stars-in-galaxy-have-moved
The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) telescope analyzed the __________ of stars to track where they were born in the Milky Way galaxy.
(A) planetary systems.
(B) chemical composition.
(C) binary companions.
(D) Doppler shifts.
(E) dark matter.

Correct answer: (B)

Student responses
Sections 70178, 70186
(A) : 0 students
(B) : 25 students
(C) : 2 students
(D) : 7 student
(E) : 2 students

Astronomy current events question: HD 219134b transit

Astronomy 210L, fall semester 2015
Cuesta College, San Luis Obispo, CA

Students are assigned to read online articles on current astronomy events, and take a short current events quiz during the first 10 minutes of lab. (This motivates students to show up promptly to lab, as the time cut-off for the quiz is strictly enforced!)
Christine Pulliam, "Cassiopeia's Hidden Gem: The Closest Rocky, Transiting Planet" (July 30, 2015)
www.cfa.harvard.edu/news/2015-16
The Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) discovered the closest known rocky planet HD 219134b when the planet:
(A) emitted gamma rays.
(B) reflected microwaves.
(C) passed in front of its star.
(D) gravitationally pulls on its star.
(E) vaporized in a supernova explosion.

Correct answer: (C)

Student responses
Sections 70178, 70186
(A) : 1 student
(B) : 4 students
(C) : 23 students
(D) : 7 student
(E) : 0 students

Astronomy current events question: cosmic wind erosion

Astronomy 210L, fall semester 2015
Cuesta College, San Luis Obispo, CA

Students are assigned to read online articles on current astronomy events, and take a short current events quiz during the first 10 minutes of lab. (This motivates students to show up promptly to lab, as the time cut-off for the quiz is strictly enforced!)
Jim Shelton, "Dust Pillars of Destruction Reveal Impact of Cosmic Wind on Galaxy Evolution" (July 27, 2015)
news.yale.edu/2015/07/27/dust-pillars-destruction-reveal-impact-cosmic-wind-galaxy-evolution
Hubble Space Telescope images show __________ eroding gas and dust at the edges of a Coma cluster spiral galaxy.
(A) vacuum energy.
(B) cosmic winds.
(C) a central supermassive black hole.
(D) antimatter.
(E) supernova explosions.

Correct answer: (B)

Student responses
Sections 70178, 70186
(A) : 4 students
(B) : 26 students
(C) : 2 students
(D) : 0 student
(E) : 3 students

20150826

Physics presentation: free fall

This is only just a little disturbing, but I can't stop watching this. (Movie link: "experiment with apples.")

So let's try to analyze this and similar types of motion--free fall--using graphs and equations from our one-dimensional motion toolbox.

Our working definition of free fall is an object that is subject only to the force of gravity. Nothing in contact with it, nor any drag (although we often make the assumption that drag forces are negligible).

So let's take a look at how the kinematic equations turn out for free fall motion.

We'll consider the convention where up is the positive vertical direction. (If you're the type that likes to call down positive, you're a freak.) Since an object in free fall is only experiencing the force of gravity, then it will experience the acceleration due to gravity (of magnitude 9.80 m/s2), which is directed downwards, and thus requires an obligatory negative sign.

Note that our vertical motion equations will then have a vertical acceleration ay = –9.80 m/s2. Again, that obligatory negative sign (also we'll assume that the starting position is y0 = 0 m at t0 = 0 s).

Also the quadratic formula will often be useful as well for free fall.

Let's take a look at every conceivable vertical velocity vy vs. t graph there could possibly be for any type of free fall situation.

But don't worry, there are only three possible graphs. Notice that they have all have the same negative slope--and since the slope of a velocity versus time graph is acceleration, these graphs all have the same acceleration ay = –9.80 m/s2. The only difference between these graphs is the initial vertical velocity v0y, whether positive (thrown upwards), zero (and thus released from rest), or negative (and thus thrown downwards).

So let's take a look at some situations, and decide which free fall graph best describes them (assuming we can neglect drag).

A boy steps off of a ledge (with no initial vertical velocity) and splashes into the water below.
The vy(t) graph has __________ initial velocity v0y.
(A) a negative.
(B) zero.
(C) a positive.
(D) (Unsure/guessing/lost/help!)

The vertical distance traveled is __________ the magnitude of the vertical displacement.
(A) less than.
(B) equal to.
(C) greater than.
(D) (Unsure/guessing/lost/help!)

A ball is thrown and released downwards from the top of a building, and hits the ground below.
The vy(t) graph has __________ initial velocity v0y.
(A) a negative.
(B) zero.
(C) a positive.
(D) (Unsure/guessing/lost/help!)

The vertical distance traveled is __________ the magnitude of the vertical displacement.
(A) less than.
(B) equal to.
(C) greater than.
(D) (Unsure/guessing/lost/help!)

A hat is thrown and released upwards into the air and lands on the grass below.
The vy(t) graph has __________ initial velocity v0y.
(A) a negative.
(B) zero.
(C) a positive.
(D) (Unsure/guessing/lost/help!)

The vertical distance traveled is __________ the magnitude of the vertical displacement.
(A) less than.
(B) equal to.
(C) greater than.
(D) (Unsure/guessing/lost/help!)

Online reading assignment: flipped classroom, motions and cycles (SLO campus)

Astronomy 210, fall semester 2015
Cuesta College, San Luis Obispo, CA

Students have a weekly online reading assignment (hosted by SurveyMonkey.com), where they answer questions based on reading their textbook, material covered in previous lectures, opinion questions, and/or asking (anonymous) questions or making (anonymous) comments. Full credit is given for completing the online reading assignment before next week's lecture, regardless if whether their answers are correct/incorrect. Selected results/questions/comments are addressed by the instructor at the start of the following lecture.

The following questions were asked on reading textbook chapters and previewing presentations on Earth's rotation/precession/revolution/tilt, the moon's motions and cycles, and watching two video presentations on the flipped class: "What Is the Flipped Class?" and "How the Flipped Classroom Works."

Selected/edited responses are given below.

Describe something you found interesting from the assigned textbook reading or presentation preview, and explain why this was personally interesting for you.
"I was aware of Earth's orbit and rotation before but I had never known about precession. It was also interesting to learn that it takes 26,000 years for it to be completed."

"'Sun-sign' astrology was really interesting because it made Earth's revolution more clear."

"That the north star will never be the same star. It's pretty cool that after a lot of years the earth's axis will be so different, that different stars become the north star."

"It was odd to me to think that we are always seeing the same side of the moon, but just witnessing shifting shadows to make the moon phases."

"I always noticed on a calendar when it says there will be a half moon or full moon, but I didn't realize the stages it goes through or bow it takes about a month."

"I am excited to be using the starwheel."

"I was never really a huge fan of astronomy, nor did I take it during my high school years. Now that I am enrolled in this class, I seemed to have an interest about zodiac signs, the different meanings and horoscopes for each one to me is amazing and at the same time confusing on how they came up with it! I'm excited to see what other techniques I will learn and develop."

"One of the presentation slides gave me an 'ah-ha' moment--the section about zodiac signs and how the sun is basically hiding the zodiac from view. I am a Cancer and I remember one night trying to find the 'stupid' (at the time) crab during my birth month and couldn't, now I know why."

Describe something you found confusing from the assigned textbook reading or presentation preview, and explain why this was personally confusing for you.
"The phases of the moon. I understand that they start at new moon, but how do you tell just by looking at the moon which phase it has?"

"Keeping straight the differences between precession, rotation, and revolution. I often find myself mixing them up."

"The ideas of equinoxes and solstices. I do not fully understand how they occur and the general significance of their occurrence; I would like to learn more about these ideas." "

What date would Virgo be just above the east horizon, as seen by an observer at 11 PM in San Luis Obispo, CA? (Ignore daylight saving time.)
February 20.  ********************** [22]
April 25.  [0]
July 4.  [0]
August 20.  ** [2]
(Unsure/guessing/lost/help!)  ********* [9]

Match these cycles with their approximate duration.
(Only correct responses shown.)
Earth's rotation: 24 hours [93%]
Earth's revolution: one year [76%]
Earth's precession: 26,000 years [100%]
The moon's revolution: one month [85%]

Place these moon phases in chronological order in their cycle (starting with new moon).
(Only correct responses shown, in unscrambled order.)
New moon: first [100%]
Waxing crescent: second [79%]
First quarter: third [85%]
Waxing gibbous: fourth [%]
Full moon: fifth [76%]
Waning gibbous: sixth [79%]
Third quarter: seventh [76%]
Waning crescent: eighth [76%]

Explain what is different about homework in a flipped class.
"I have no idea what this is yet."

"Homework for a flipped class is assigned and done prior to the class whereas in a regular class homework is assigned in class for the next class. This method of the flipped class allows students to utilize class time for asking questions/ getting clarification on the material."

"Homework also includes the lecture that would usually just be in class."

"The homework prepares you for the next lesson."

"Teachers assign homework to be done at home through work, presentations, and videos that the teacher prepares, so that in class the teacher can spend time teaching concepts that were reviewed at home before class, through active activity participation and in-class questions on previously studied material."

"Lecture material is given to the students before the class."

Describe where/when most student learning occurs in a flipped class.
"Most student learning occurs outside the classroom on the student's own time. Classtime is used to reflect on what was learned and fill in the gaps."

"In a flipped class most student learning occurs at home prior to class."

"Students learn most in the class, where they are allowed to ask questions and do 'hands-on' activities."

"Divided somewhat equally between the classroom and at home, but slightly more applied learning in the classroom."

"It would depend on how you learn. If you learn best listening, you would learn most from the lectures viewed before class. If you are more hands-on, you would learn more during the in-class activities.

Ask the instructor an anonymous question, or make a comment. Selected questions/comments may be discussed in class.
"What are some credible online sources for astronomy news? (NASA first, and the online versions of Sky & Telescope or Astronomy magazines (although they have a lot of advertisements.)

"Are we in the same groups throughout the semester? If not, how often do they change?" (Groups will change every week.)

"I think this whole flipped classroom thing is pretty cool. I like the idea of being able to review material prior to class and then still have it accessible after the lecture. Have you seen any significant student improvement due to this flipped classroom technique?" (That is the focus of my education research.)

"Will study guides be given before exams and will they greatly reflect the exam content?" (Yes, and we'll go over the study guide for the upcoming first quiz.)

Online reading assignment: motion

Physics 205A, fall semester 2015
Cuesta College, San Luis Obispo, CA

Students have a weekly online reading assignment (hosted by SurveyMonkey.com), where they answer questions based on reading their textbook, material covered in previous lectures, opinion questions, and/or asking (anonymous) questions or making (anonymous) comments. Full credit is given for completing the online reading assignment before next week's lecture, regardless if whether their answers are correct/incorrect. Selected results/questions/comments are addressed by the instructor at the start of the following lecture.

The following questions were asked on the reading textbook chapters and previewing a flipped class presentation on (constant acceleration) motion.


Selected/edited responses are given below.

Describe what you understand from the assigned textbook reading or presentation preview. Your description (2-3 sentences) should specifically demonstrate your level of understanding.
"When we are talking about motion, there are three main components: postion, velocity, and acceleration. We can find the velocity by taking the derivative of position, and find acceleration by taking the derivative of velocity."

"I've have a solid understanding of calculus and algebra so all this is not a huge issue."

"I understand the graphical relations chart between kinematic quantities as well as the constant acceleration kinematic equations."

"I understand what we get when calculating the derivatives or the integrals of function graphs. I know that taking the chord slope results in the average rate of change, and the tangent slope at a point is the instantaneous rate of change at that point."

Describe what you found confusing from the assigned textbook reading or presentation preview. Your description (2-3 sentences) should specifically identify the concept(s) that you do not understand.
"I didn't find anything confusing because I've already seen all of this material before. It was good for review, however."

"I could use some clarification about calculating the velocity and acceleration using a graph. I thought that was a little confusing and could use some practice graphing actual examples step-by-step in class to get a more solid foundation for doing it myself."

"I'm just not that familiar with all the new symbols and abbreviations yet, and occasionally I have to re read them a few times and look back in the text to review before I can get new concepts."

"Just reading through the presentation did not help me understand the concepts, but it did help me key in on subjects within the textbook. But overall there was nothing that really confused me."

"I find how to use the chain of pain confusing. I also would like some examples of using the equations given to us on the presentation preview and how to know when to use which."

Mark the level of your exposure to (basic calculus) concepts of derivatives/integrals.
None at all.   * [1]
Slight.   ********** [10]
Some.   ************** [14]
A fair amount.  *************************** [27]
A lot.   ************ [12]

Mark the level of your expertise in algebraically solving multiple equations for multiple unknowns.
None at all.   ************ [12]
Slight.   **************** [16]
Some.   **************** [16]
A fair amount.  *********** [11]
A lot.   ********* [9]

Briefly describe the difference(s) between a chord slope and a tangent slope on a graph.
"A chord slope connects to two places on the graph. A tangent slope touches only one point on the graph."

"The slope of a (position versus time graph) chord gives average velocity over a shorter a time interval. Slope of a (position versus time graph) tangent gives instantaneous velocity."

"Not sure, I couldn't find the answer in the presentation and I have still not received my textbook."


Indicate how each of these quantities are determined from kinematic graphs.
(Only correct responses shown.)
Displacement ∆x: area under a vx(t) graph. [48%]
Position x: (None of these choices.) [50%]
Change in (instantaneous) velocity ∆vx: area under an ax(t) graph. [44%]
(Instantaneous) velocity vx: tangent slope of an x(t) graph. [61%]
Average velocity vx,av: chord slope of an x(t) graph. [50%]
(Instantaneous) acceleration ax: tangent slope of a vx(t) graph. [55%]
Average acceleration ax,av: chord slope of a vx(t) graph. [55%]

Ask the instructor an anonymous question, or make a comment. Selected questions/comments may be discussed in class.
"I'm really not digging this way of teaching. I had to deal with the same issue in another class last year--we basically had to teach ourselves and that was the worst way to learn for those who have never seen this material. Are we supposed to just read this material for the first time and understand it, just like that? We need more lecture on what we're supposed to get out of this class." (We always will have some lecture in class, as long as there is sufficient feedback to determine specifically what the class as a whole is having the most problems with. I can't lecture on everything everyone will ever need to know, as (a) there really isn't enough time for that in class, and (b) not everyone will have the same difficulties on every topic. So don't think you're being forced to teach yourselves--think of it as assessing what you are having the most difficulty with (well, sometimes it can be everything) such that we can best address these difficulties in class.)

"I'm not entirely sure how to read the chain of pain or necessarily how to use it. And what is a helpful way to determine which kinematic equation to use? Can you go over those in class?" (Yes, we'll go through those things in class. ALL THE THINGS.)

"Wow am I confused! I've been looking over this information the last couple days and nothing seems to be making sense to me."

"I needed a review on this and then I got it, no problem."

20150825

Online reading assignment: flipped classroom, motions and cycles (NC campus)

Astronomy 210, fall semester 2015
Cuesta College, San Luis Obispo, CA

Students have a weekly online reading assignment (hosted by SurveyMonkey.com), where they answer questions based on reading their textbook, material covered in previous lectures, opinion questions, and/or asking (anonymous) questions or making (anonymous) comments. Full credit is given for completing the online reading assignment before next week's lecture, regardless if whether their answers are correct/incorrect. Selected results/questions/comments are addressed by the instructor at the start of the following lecture.

The following questions were asked on reading textbook chapters and previewing presentations on Earth's rotation/precession/revolution/tilt, the moon's motions and cycles, and watching two video presentations on the flipped class: "What Is the Flipped Class?" and "How the Flipped Classroom Works."


Selected/edited responses are given below.

Describe something you found interesting from the assigned textbook reading or presentation preview, and explain why this was personally interesting for you.
"Seasons are not caused by distance between the earth and sun, but by the amount of solar energy received in the northern and southern hemispheres at different times of the year."

"At certain points of the precession there is no north star. I always thought there was just one north star so I thought it was interesting to learn that the north star changes and sometimes it doesn't exist."

"'Sun-sign' astrology--it amazes me that if you could look directly at both the sun and stars every day for a month you would see the same constellation, but each month Earth is directly signed up with a new one."

"As a child my parents would bring me and my brother out every night to spot the Big Dipper. Yet Australians never see the Big Dipper."

"The lunar phases--I have always loved looking at the moon, so it was interesting to actually know what the phases are."

"It's fascinating to know that the changing shape of the moon as it passes through its cycle of phases is produced by sunlight illuminating different parts of the side of the moon that we see."

Describe something you found confusing from the assigned textbook reading or presentation preview, and explain why this was personally confusing for you.
"Looking at pictures and deciding which type of moon is shown is personally confusing for me. I have difficulties telling the difference between waxing or waning and crescent, gibbous, and quarter."

"I don't know why but I couldn't really wrap my mind around Earth's precession and it taking 26,000 years."

"I'm having trouble wrapping my brain around it to visualize the celestial sphere."

"Precession and pole-wandering."

What date would Virgo be just above the east horizon, as seen by an observer at 11 PM in San Luis Obispo, CA? (Ignore daylight saving time.)
February 20.  *************** [15]
April 25.  * [1]
July 4.  [0]
August 20.  ***** [5]
(Unsure/guessing/lost/help!)  ****** [6]

Match these cycles with their approximate duration.
(Only correct responses shown.)
Earth's rotation: 24 hours [85%]
Earth's revolution: one year [50%]
Earth's precession: 26,000 years [96%]
The moon's revolution: one month [74%]

Place these moon phases in chronological order in their cycle (starting with new moon).
(Only correct responses shown, in unscrambled order.)
New moon: first [93%]
Waxing crescent: second [67%]
First quarter: third [70%]
Waxing gibbous: fourth [63%]
Full moon: fifth [85%]
Waning gibbous: sixth [56%]
Third quarter: seventh [59%]
Waning crescent: eighth [59%]

Explain what is different about homework in a flipped class.
"When doing homework, students have access to presentations and other notes that the teacher puts online so the students can look something over again."

"More ways to learn, for many different types of learning. Students can learn at their own pace and bring questions to class."

"The difference about homework in a flipped class is that the student is give the next class material in advance and given the opportunity better understand what going to be talked about in the next lecture."

"Homework in a flipped class is what you would normally learn in class but is done before, so the teacher is free to assign more hands-on activities in class."

"Students are able to complete reading assignments and other assignments at their own pace, making it easier to learn the material."

"In a flipped class you do a lot of your learning online, and this brings you to class with some pre-existing knowledge."

Describe where/when most student learning occurs in a flipped class.
"Most of the learning happens during the class time. What students had read before class gets reinforced. Students get more hands on work so the teacher also has the opportunity to help students fill in any gaps they have about the material."

"In the classroom where the student can clarify any subjects they weren't too sure on."

"Usually you read the lectures at home on your own time. So I would say that's where you would learn the most in a flipped class."

"The most student learning occurs independently, which the instructor there to help with any questions in class."

"Most learning occurs in class because you have studied before and get questions answered and explained."

"In the classroom."

"At home."

Ask the instructor an anonymous question, or make a comment. Selected questions/comments may be discussed in class.
"Which one do you like better, Star Trek or Star Wars? (I'm Star Wars' #1 fan!)

"I'm really looking forward to this class and am excited to experience the flipped classroom!" (Me, too.)

"P-dog, are we allowed to listen to music while in class? Just in one ear, it helps me concentrate." (I'm going to say no. But be thankful you have two ears--I only have one.)

"In this class will we be talking about astrology? I'm some what curious to find out if astrology can make accurate predictions about my future." (My horoscope says...yes. Yes, we will be learning about astrology.)

"Is Mars really going to be spectacularly visible on August 27th?" (Snopes.com says no.)

20150824

Online reading assignment: speed and velocity

Physics 205A, fall semester 2015
Cuesta College, San Luis Obispo, CA

Students have a weekly online reading assignment (hosted by SurveyMonkey.com), where they answer questions based on reading their textbook, material covered in previous lectures, opinion questions, and/or asking (anonymous) questions or making (anonymous) comments. Full credit is given for completing the online reading assignment before next week's lecture, regardless if whether their answers are correct/incorrect. Selected results/questions/comments are addressed by the instructor at the start of the following lecture.

The following questions were asked on the reading textbook chapters and previewing a presentation on displacement, distance traveled, and average/instantaneous speed/velocity.


Selected/edited responses are given below.

Describe what you understand from the assigned textbook reading or presentation preview. Your description (2-3 sentences) should specifically demonstrate your level of understanding.
"Displacement (magnitude) is the straight-line distance, not necessarily the distance traveled; and speed and velocity are different. Speed is distance traveled over time and velocity is the displacement over time, which has a direction."

"Instantaneous speed is just the magnitude of the instantaneous velocity."

Describe what you found confusing from the assigned textbook reading or presentation preview. Your description (2-3 sentences) should specifically identify the concept(s) that you do not understand.
"The difference between distance traveled and displacement."

"There was nothing that I found confusing. But it would be nice if there was also a in-class discussion on it just to make sure that I have everything down."

"How instantaneous speed and instantaneous velocity are connected."

Briefly describe how you would walk along a straight, level road such that your distance traveled would be longer than your displacement.
"You could walk back-and-forth along the same line multiple times."

"I walk 30 feet forwards and go backwards 10 feet. My distance traveled would be 40 feet, and the (magnitude of) displacement would be 20 feet."

"If the road was a snake-like curve, the distance traveled along the road would be longer than the (magnitude of the) straight-line displacement from the beginning of the road to the end of the road."

In general, average speed will be __________ the magnitude of average velocity.
less than.   ***** [5]
equal to.   ******************* [19]
greater than.   *************** [15]
(More than one of the above choices.)  ************* [13]
(None of the above choices.)   *** [3]
(Unsure/guessing/lost/help!)  ******* [7]

In general, (instantaneous) speed will be __________ the magnitude of (instantaneous) velocity.
less than.   **** [4]
equal to.   ************************ [24]
greater than.   ************************ [24]
(More than one of the above choices.)  ************ [12]
(None of the above choices.)   ** [2]
(Unsure/guessing/lost/help!)  ******** [8]

In general, which of the following quantities could be negative?
Average velocity.  *********** [11]
Average speed.  [0]
(Instantaneous) velocity.   *** [3]
(Instantaneous) speed.  [0]
(More than one of the above choices.)  ***************************** [29]
(None of the above choices.)   [1]
(All of the above choices.)  ****** [6]
(Unsure/guessing/lost/help!)  *** [3]

An odometer measures an object's:
displacement.   *** [3]
distance traveled.  ********************************************************* [57]
(instantaneous) velocity.   * [1]
(instantaneous) speed.  * [1]
(Unsure/guessing/lost/help!)  [0]

A speedometer measures an object's:
displacement.   ** [2]
distance traveled.   [0]
(instantaneous) velocity.   ****** [6]
(instantaneous) speed.  ****************************************************** [54]
(Unsure/guessing/lost/help!)  [0]

Ask the instructor an anonymous question, or make a comment. Selected questions/comments may be discussed in class.
"How do you denote the direction of a velocity when it isn't along a west-east path?" (Woah there--you're talking about two-dimensional and three-dimensional motion, which we'll get to eventually. Right now let's just concentrate on one-dimensional motion, which is east-west (or left-right, or up-down) motion.)

20150820

Student written responses: technology use policy in class

Physics 205A, fall semester 2015
Cuesta College, San Luis Obispo, CA

"I Forgot My Phone"
Charlene deGuzman and Miles Crawford
http://youtu.be/OINa46HeWg8

Students fill out an index card with their written response to an instructor-selected question, turned in at the end of every class. Full credit is given for completion in a thoughtful manner, regardless if whether their answers are correct/incorrect. Selected results/questions/comments are addressed by the instructor at the start of the following lecture.

The following questions were asked on their attitudes towards the appropriateness of texting and social networking smartphone use in class, in order to formulate a consensus-based class-wide policy.

Regarding non-instructional use of electronic devices by yourself and others around you, how important to you is it to have a distraction-free learning environment in class?
Not important at all.  ********* [9]
Somewhat important.   *************************************** [39]
Very important.   ************************* [25]
Absolutely essential.   ********* [9]
(Unsure/guessing/lost/help!)   [0]

Selected/edited responses are given below.
As long as there is no vibrations or noise, I don't care if people use their phones. If they don't want to learn or pay attention that is up to them. It's their money and their grade."

"I'm here to learn, not socialize with people around the world."

"When there is a lot of distraction in class it takes away from my ability to learn, as much as I'd like to think I learn just as well with distractions, I don't."

"I get distracted very easily and need a quiet environment to study in."

"This important for me because it makes the learning environment distraction-free and allows me to focus on the work in class than others around me."

Non-instructional use of electronic devices in class should occur:
frequently.  **** [4]
occasionally.   ************************************** [38]
rarely.   ********************************** [34]
never.   ***** [5]
(Unsure/guessing/lost/help!)   [0]

Selected/edited responses are given below.
"I don't think it should be okay for people to blatantly have their phones out constantly."

"I'm always scheduling stuff and checking with coworkers on who's covering whose shifts."

"I personally use my phone as a watch and a calculator."

"No videos and no off-topic use of laptops visible to people behind you."

"Sometimes things happen in life such that communication is important. Just limit it."

"Taking pictures of notes, etc."

"As a single parent I need to keep an eye for emergency class regarding my child, which means I will periodically look at my phone during class."

"If it's important and not taking away from group work, then it should be fine."

Previous posts:
  • Flashcard question: texting/social networking in class (spring semester 2015).
  • Flashcard question: texting/social networking in class (fall semester 2014).
  • Flashcard question: texting/social networking in class (spring semester 2014).
  • Flashcard question: texting/social networking in class (fall semester 2013).
  • Flashcard question: texting/social networking in class (fall semester 2011).
  • Student written responses: technology use policy in class (NC campus)

    Astronomy 210, fall semester 2015
    Cuesta College, San Luis Obispo, CA

    "I Forgot My Phone"
    Charlene deGuzman and Miles Crawford
    http://youtu.be/OINa46HeWg8

    Students fill out an index card with their written response to an instructor-selected question, turned in at the end of every class. Full credit is given for completion in a thoughtful manner, regardless if whether their answers are correct/incorrect. Selected results/questions/comments are addressed by the instructor at the start of the following lecture.

    The following questions were asked on their attitudes towards the appropriateness of texting and social networking smartphone use in class, in order to formulate a consensus-based class-wide policy.

    Regarding non-instructional use of electronic devices by yourself and others around you, how important to you is it to have a distraction-free learning environment in class?
    Not important at all.  *** [3]
    Somewhat important.   ************ [12]
    Very important.   ******** [8]
    Absolutely essential.   ****** [6]
    (Unsure/guessing/lost/help!)   [0]

    Selected/edited responses are given below.
    "I'm paying to learn this subject. I need to hear to learn. If you're texting, and being on the phone is more important than the content of class, then don't be here. Take it outside the classroom."

    "I like learning to be focus of class."

    "I take my grades and education pretty seriously, and it would probably be distracting if everyone was on the their phone."

    Non-instructional use of electronic devices in class should occur:
    frequently.  [0]
    occasionally.   ******* [7]
    rarely.   *************** [15]
    never.   ****** [6]
    (Unsure/guessing/lost/help!)   [0]

    Selected/edited responses are given below.
    "You don't really need to use your phone during class unless it's an emergency."

    "There could be exceptions when people need to be on call for family or work."

    "Okay briefly if you're taking a picture notes or handouts, or need a calculator."

    "Only use your phone for checking time and responding to a quick text."

    "This depends on the situation, I think, but I feel as long as all work is done that needs to be done, phones (without sound) can be used. When work starts up again, phones go away."

    Previous posts:
  • Flashcard question: texting/social networking in class (spring semester 2015).
  • Flashcard question: texting/social networking in class (fall semester 2014).
  • Flashcard question: texting/social networking in class (spring semester 2014).
  • Flashcard question: texting/social networking in class (fall semester 2013).
  • Flashcard question: texting/social networking in class (fall semester 2011).
  •